Business Meeting FAQs

Business Meeting FAQs

By Carolyn Rogers

Q. Is there just one business meeting or two?

A. There are actually two meetings, and they take place consecutively. The business meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (“Academy”) is immediately followed by the business meeting of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons (“Association”).

Q. What’s the difference between the two meetings?

A. The first meeting addresses issues concerning the “Academy”—the 501(c)(3) organization that is responsible for education and research endeavors. The second meeting focuses on issues of the “Association”—the 501(c)(6) organization that is responsible for advocacy, lobbying activities and other health policy initiatives.

Q. When and where do the business meetings take place?

A. The business meetings are conducted after the Ceremonial Meeting, which starts at 8 a.m. tomorrow, Thursday, Feb. 15, in Ballroom 20 of the San Diego Convention Center. The AAOS Town Hall Meeting follows immediately after the business meetings.

Q. What type of business is addressed at these meetings?

A. During the Academy meeting:

The Bylaws Committee presents its recommendations on each set of proposed amendments to the Academy Bylaws. (See article on page 5A.)

The Resolutions Committee presents its recommendations on each Academy resolution under consideration. (See article on page 4A.)

The AAOS Treasurer and the chair of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation present their financial reports.

During the Association meeting:

Nominations for the following year’s Nominating Committee are accepted from the floor.

The chair of the Political Action Committee (PAC) reports on the funds raised and distributed by the PAC.

The Resolutions Committee presents its recommendations regarding each Association resolution under consideration. (See article on page 4A.)

The Bylaws Committee submits its recommendations on each set of proposed amendments to the Association Bylaws and the proposed Standards of Professionalism (SOPs). (See article on page 5A.)

The chair of the current Nominating Committee announces the committee’s recommended slate for each elected vacancy on the AAOS Board of Directors (BOD) and other leadership positions.

Election of officers and at-large members of the BOD is determined by a vote of the fellows present at this meeting.

Retiring members of the Board are honored for their service.

Q. What does the Nominating Committee do?

A. The AAOS Nominating Committee identifies and recommends individuals for election to available AAOS leadership volunteer positions, including officers, members of the BOD, members of the Membership Committee and nominees to the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Tomorrow, James H. Herndon, MD, chair of the 2007 Nominating Committee, will present the recommended slate for vacancies on the AAOS BOD, including the positions of second vice-president and two at-large members, a member of the National Membership Committee and four nominees to the serve on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Q. How are members selected to serve on the Nominating Committee?

A. The Nominating Committee is comprised of a chair, appointed by the BOD, and six members who are elected by fellowship ballot. Nominations for the Nominating Committee are accepted from the floor during the Association’s Annual Business Meeting.

At tomorrow’s meeting, nominations will be accepted for the six open positions on the 2008 Nominating Committee. The final selection of the Nominating Committee will occur by ballot, which will be distributed to members later in the year.

The 2007 Nominating Committee is comprised of Dr. Herndon, chair; John J. Callaghan, MD; Robert D. D’Ambrosia, MD; Kenneth E. DeHaven, MD; Joseph P. Iannotti, MD; Jesse B. Jupiter, MD; and Marc F. Swiontkowski, MD. Mary I. O’Conner, MD, is an alternate member.

Q. How many people must be present at the business meeting for a vote to be valid?

A. The business of the fellowship may be conducted at business meetings only when a quorum is present. A quorum consists of no less than one hundred (100) fellows eligible to vote.

Q. How does the Resolutions Committee develop its recommendations on the proposed resolutions?

A. The Resolutions Committee will hold an open hearing today at 1:30 p.m. in Room 8 of the San Diego Convention Center on the resolutions that will be considered during Business Meetings.

At the business meetings, the Resolutions Committee will present its proposed recommendation regarding each resolution under consideration. Shortly after the Annual Meeting, the committee’s final recommendations on the resolutions will be distributed to all fellows for a vote. To be adopted, at least 20 percent of the fellowship must vote on a given resolution, and at least 50 percent of those voting must approve it.

Q. How does the Bylaws Committee develop its recommendations on the proposed bylaws and SOPs?

A. During the Annual Meeting, the Bylaws Committee convenes an open hearing to receive comments on the proposed bylaw amendments and SOPs. This open hearing is scheduled for today at approximately 2:45 p.m.—shortly after the conclusion of the Resolutions Committee’s open hearing and in the same room.

At the business meetings, the Bylaws Committee will present its recommendations regarding each set of proposed bylaw amendments and SOPs. Shortly after the Annual Meeting, these recommendations will be voted on by the fellowship. To be adopted, an amendment to the Bylaws or the SOPs requires that at least 20 percent of eligible fellows vote and that of those voting, two-thirds vote to adopt the amendment or SOPs.

Q. How long do the business meetings usually last?

A. No more than an hour, combined.


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